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the united states government and egyptian government are friends, not enemies? >> ( translated ): we are not enemies, of course. >> rose: you're our friends? >> ( translated ): for sure we are friends. >> rose: allies? >> the u.s. president said otherwise. >> rose: i know he did. but i'm asking the egyptian president. do you consider the united states an ally? >> ( translated ): this is depending on the definition of an ally. we have a real partnership in the interest and we want to achieve the interest of the world and to participate in many issues-- diplomatic, political, economical-- exchange of expertise in several areas. so the understanding of an ally as a part of a military alliance this is not existing right now. but if you mean by ally, partner and special diplomatic relationship and cooperation we are that ally. >> rose: president morsi for the hour. next. >> tonight a special edition of charlie rose. >> rose: mohamed morsi won an historic election this june to become the fifth president of egypt. he is the first civilian to hold this title. two years ago it would have been
president of the united states bill clinton in conversation with me and my colleague at cbs nora o'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it to the only has the possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to w but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will hold on to the house and it will be about 50/50 in the senate, more or less the way it is now. you can't filibuster a budget. it's the only thing that doesn't require 60 votes in the senate to pass o as opposed to 51. so a lot of the policymaking will be pushed into the budget and he'll just have to pick up one or two people on that. if you assume that he is going to do what he said he's going to do, i think a lot of his priorities will be enacted. and i think it will be bad on the budget side, as i said. including
. the impasse is just one of the many strains on relations between russia and the united states. iran is another is the dis trust over nato's defense shield. earlier this month the u.s. agency of the international development to lead russia. i'm pleased to have sergey lavrov back at this table, welcome. >> thank you very much, nice to be back. >> rose: u.s.-russia relations. >> yes, i believe we agree that these relations should be promoted. when president obama came to the whitehouse, he and his team assessed the relationship between moscow and washington and suggested what they call the reset of those relations which we supported. and i believe that since then, we have been having understanding between us, between moscow and russia, that the really mutually beneficial partnership in the interest of the russian and american people in the interest of international relations given the importance of the two countries can be based on equal, mutually respectful, mually beneficial relatiohip. and on that route, we achieved quite a lot. i would be incomplete if i don't mention that there are problems
with a film made in the u.s. that ridicules the prophet mohammad. >> i have made it clear the united states had nothing to do with this video. it is an insult to muslims but america as well, that i have witnessed after nearly four years as president. i remain ever hopeful all right world that we live in. the war in iraq is over. american troops have come home. al qaeda's been weakened. and osama bin laden is no more. >> obama took the podium six weeks before the u.s. presidential election. he spent much of his time defending his record on foreign policy. >>> to coincide with the open egg ofhe general asell blame, british charity has released a video report on children in syria who are suffering from the escalating violence. many syrian children are haunted by the memory of seeing family members killed in front of their eyes. they have observed children becoming overaggressive. some have injured themselves due to severe psychological wounds. they say a school in the syrian capital, damascus, was bombed on tuesday and children's lives are at risk. the video report shows children sheltering in
united states will do what we must to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. >> woodruff: but iran's president, mahmoud ahmadinejad, has long insisted that the country's nuclear program is only for peaceful purposes. and during his own speech yesterday, he denounced potential military action by israel. >> testing new generations of ultra-modern weaponry and the pledge to disclose these armaments in due time is now being used as a new language of threat against nations to coerce them into accepting a new era of hegemony. continued threats by the uncivilized zionists to resort to military action against our great nation is a clear example of this bitter reality. >> woodruff: earlier this week, iran unveiled a new long-range reconnaissance drone and the country's revolutionary guard said it tested new missiles as well. prime minister netanyahu noted that while international sanctions by the u.s. and other countries have hurt the iranian economy, they did not stop its nuclear program. >> there's only one way to peacefully prevent iran from getting atomic bombs. and that's by placing a
's got the uwe united states out of iraq. the united states after going up has now come down to some extent in afghanistan. he mdleast,ven though it's turbulent, is more open than it was. so i think the president in general can point to some areas where he moved forward and some areas obviously his critics will say where he movedded back. all in all it's a defense i believe and defendable record. >> ifill: i want to walk through some of that piece by piece. referencing the president's speech today, he turned over a big chunk of it to talking about the difference between railing against or speaking out against violence... violent extremism versus protecting free speech. why was so much devoted to that topic? >> gwen, i thought it was an interesting speech. very reflective speech. i think probably designd by the president and his advisors to try to heal some of the wounds that have been so apparent between the muslim world and the united states over these last two weeks, these very tragic weeks. i thought it was interesting the way he framed the issue. he clearly disassociated the unit
further monetary policy to boost the united states economy. after last friday's disappointing labor report there is a growing call for a robust response from the central bank which is the fed, financial markets have rallied with the expectation of a third round of bond buying known as cuan tative easing. but that option is controversial with the election two months away. joining me from washington david leonhardt, washington bureau chief of the "new york times". in 2011 he won a pulitzer prize rhis columns on the u.s. economy. i'm pleased to have him back on this program. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what might the fed do and what consequences might happen? >> well, the fed is now talking about doing a version of something it has already done a couple timesment people may have heard the phrase q e3 to refer to what this is n technical terms that is quantitative easing 3. let's skip the technical terms, in essence it would buy up assets. in the course of buying up assets it would try to reduce long-term interest rate short trem interest rates are already essentily at zero, the fed mov
a lot of the same problems that we have here in the united states. >> ifill: is there also a problem with coming to some sort of resolution as far as germany and other bank-- money-- money givers go? that somebody else is going to get in line. that if you give greece money, spain is going to be standing there. if you give spain money portugal could be standing there. >> there is this problem of political moral hazard going on which is really, as you say, well, if you give us, let's say, debt relief to greece, well, then you can be pretty sure that other european countries that also have received bailouts will want the same treatment. so what you're trying to do in europe, in minute, is really to-- i believe that ultimately debt relief will have-- further debt relief will have to be given to greece by the euro area governments. but they're really trying to make the road to that so arduous and so terrible that nobody else in europe will really want to go down that ute. an as we'r looking at greece today-- which has a cumulative decline in g.d.p. of, you know, close to 20% and still dro
it become a genuine crisis. it's also a reminder to the united states of why it is seen as important by many nations in asia that we stay as a balancing factor in the military relationship there >> warner: china doesn't like that >> they would prefer it to having japan arm itself. so everybody resents the u.s. presence but is more comforting than the most obvious alternative > waer: you have a prediction? >> i think it will calm down but the issues will be simmering for some time. all the territorial maritime issues that are taking place now are of a peace. the political process is still playing out in china. the leaders there want to contain the damage to themselves but they don't want to be so suppressing of popular opinion that they're seen as opposing popular will on the issue of sovereignty >> warner: or out of touch. doug paal and jim fall owes, thank you. >> woodruff: next, seeking peace in syria and around the globe. jeffrey brown talks to former u.n. secretary general kofi annan. >> brown: kofi annan's first career u.n. staffer to rise to head the organization has spent more than 4
by the united states. >> fundamentally we do not take seriously the threats of an attack on iran by them even though we are iran. iran at the end of the day is a great country. let me assure you we do have all defensive means at our disposal. >> prime minister netanyahu has said that israel simply cannot stand to have iran to get to the point where it has enough enriched uranium to be able to very quickly convert that to weapons grade and really essentially from a weaon in a matter of months. he's made it clear that israel is prepared to take military action to try to prevent that. do you think he's bluffing? >> you see, whether he's bluffing or he really intends that does not even come into the equation. for us. what are these scientists? put a world map in front of you. put an at last in front of you. iran has been iran for the last 7,000-10,000 years. they have been occupying those territories for the last 60 to 70 years with the support and force of the westerners. they have no roots there in history. >> ifill: i'm joined by margaret warner who is at the u.n. this afternoon. margaret, tha
, when should united nations or member states intervene? >> well, these are different situations. in libya, i think we've been right in intervening because gaddafi was a dictator, and you remember that there was a sort of libyan spring, and nobody was possible because of gaddafi. therefore, a decision was taken to intervene. >> rose: is the principle you don't intervene no matter how atroacials the acts of the government in power, if in fact they have a member of the security council who opposes? or if in fact they have an army which will make it a very bloody affair. >> no. >> rose: are those the rules? >> no. the rule is because of veto if one or two people-- nations -- permanent security members-- we cannot contribute because our principle is to intervene only if we have a legal authorization. and up to now, three times, russia and china say no. and, therefore, up to now, we haven't been able to intervene. which is a humanitarian catastrophe. because every day you have more than 200 people killed. and because the security council doesn't say yes, we can't do anything. no, it's
of their possession of nuclear weapons and weapons of mass destruction to threaten states. >> translator: israel's continuing threat to resort to military action against our nation is a clear example of this bitter reality. >> he also called for reform of the united nations and the creation of a new world order. iran chairs the conference of nonaligned countries made up of 120 countries and territories. he said unfairness and discrimination against developing countries by a few industrialized nations is creating an economic divide and fueling conflicts. >>> two car bombs exploded near the syrian army headquarters in the capital of damascus. the blast killed at least four people. the explosion struck early wednesday morning, they were followed by several hours of gun battles between rebel fighters and government forces in the downtown area. an anti-government activist told nhk the explosions hit the third and fourth floors of the building. four people died. syrian information minister said on a state television that the explosions caused only minor damage. he said there were no casualties and tha
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)